Logan Wong, Toronto


He’s already received a diploma in Social Service Work from Humber College, is just finishing his third year of Ryerson University’s Advanced Placement Stream in Social Work, and Logan Wong is already planning to get a Master’s degree in Social Work.

Born with Cerebral Palsy, Logan uses a wheelchair, and the speech recognition technology called Dragon Naturally Speaking, which helps him write assignments and tests.

Disability doesn’t define who Logan is, what he wants to do or what he will achieve.

Logan played competitive sledge hockey, soccer, downhill skiing, swimming, wheelchair tennis and basketball, and rowing.

Despite several learning disabilities, he’s maintained an average over 80% since high school and was the only Humber student in his class who was selected for Ryerson University’s Advanced Placement program.

Logan worked hard to build relevant and extensive work and volunteer experience to help him build a career in social work.

He was a Youth Host at the 2017 National Youth Summit for a National Children and Youth Charter, and was one of the organizers of this event last year, bringing youth delegates together from across Canada to identify priorities for children and youth to be addressed in Canadian public policies. As a member of the Youth Host team, Logan facilitated small group discussions and activities for summit participants.

A trained mentor for kids who are growing up with disabilities, Logan inspires and guides youth, and has also incorporated the youth perspective into Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital’s (HBKR) programs, services, and research. He volunteers at the hospital, working two days a week as a mentor with patients in the Complex Continuing Care Unit in Therapeutic Recreation, providing 1:1 group peer support on living with a disability and other personal issues.

He’s a member of HBKR’s Youth Advisory Council as well as the hospital’s Advisory Counsel for Solution Focused Care, where Logan joins board members and senior executives committed to implementing coaching practices and training that may become a future-oriented, strength-based and family-centred tool for all HBKR staff.

Last summer Logan worked as a peer support counsellor at the Easter Seals residential camp in Perth, ON and he’ll be back again this year.

Making a contribution is a priority for Logan. He served as an Easter Seals Provincial Ambassador, and a Friends of We Care Ambassador. Logan is particularly proud to have received the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for volunteerism from Ontario’s Lieutenant Governor David Onley, one of his role models.

Logan chose a career in social work to help others and to contribute to the community. It’s a field where his personal values are accepted, and appreciated.

Right now, Logan is committed to his academic development, and to his personal and professional development. Colleagues and professors describe Logan as grounded and approachable, friendly and respectful; a very compassionate person. Clearly Logan has chosen a path that allows him to use his education, training and lived experience to help others, one that will make our society a better place, especially for those who are the most marginalized members of our communities.